Poetry – Human Civilisation – A poem about appreciating the wonders around us instead of fighting because we are here for such a fleeting moment.

Originally posted on Opher's World:
Human Civilisation   Ephemeral dust On the wing of a seed; Edifying ripples From every deed, Reverberating on the wind, To hit the sky and die. ? Dancing to an arrogant beat With heart and feet While a universe of mystery Revolves with aeons Of light and heat To…

I was Dreaming – a poem

Originally posted on Opher's World:
I was Dreaming   I was dreaming But it was real; I have woken into a wonderland. ? Who could imagine such splendour? Out of nothing Into something. Out of rock, gas and water Into sons and daughters. ? Beyond our understanding Yet lighting up our eyes. A landscape…

wīg-gār

Originally posted on Old English Wordhord:
wīg-gār, m.n: a lance. (“wee-gar”) Detail of a miniature of hunters pursuing a bonnacon with a very long lance and strategic shield, from a bestiary, with extracts from Giraldus Cambrensis on Irish birds, England (Salisbury), 2nd quarter of the 13th century. British Library, Harley MS 4751, f. 11r. Bonnacons…

meox

Originally posted on Old English Wordhord:
meox, n.n: muck, dung, ordure, dirt. (“meh-oks”) Image: A bonnacon, which The Medieval Bestiary tells us is an animal like a bull that uses its dung as a weapon. Its horns curl in towards each other so are useless for defence. Pliny the Elder says “…when attacked, it runs…

hwæl-weg

Originally posted on Old English Wordhord:
hwæl-weg, m.n: the path of the whale, the ocean, the ‘whale-way’. Image: Thomas de Cantimpré, Liber de natura rerum, Valenciennes, BM, ms. 320, f. 111v. Ca 1285. From Medieval Animal Data Network.